Your Brain isn’t a Computer…

Now I love me computers… but are our brains like a computer? Eh… not so much!

Episode Link: {{d-episode-link}}

Share with Others: {{d-show-listen-link}}

{{where-to-find-me}}

{{snippet-1}}

Transcript
Jonathan Stewart:

When talking about productivity and organization,

Jonathan Stewart:

a common analogy used is our brain is like a computer.

Jonathan Stewart:

This is based on a particular form of science that says

Jonathan Stewart:

that our brains have an input.

Jonathan Stewart:

So things come in.

Jonathan Stewart:

we capture our ideas.

Jonathan Stewart:

So we capture it.

Jonathan Stewart:

We process it and then do some magical stuff with it.

Jonathan Stewart:

And then it comes out.

Jonathan Stewart:

It's an output.

Jonathan Stewart:

It goes in, we do stuff.

Jonathan Stewart:

We store it in our memory or we put it somewhere so we can remember, and

Jonathan Stewart:

then we push it out and it's done.

Jonathan Stewart:

But as our brains fill up, we run out of RAM and space in

Jonathan Stewart:

our brain slash hard drive.

Jonathan Stewart:

But the problem is the idea that our brain is a computer is overly simplified.

Jonathan Stewart:

It's not quite like that, although there is some truthiness to it and there are

Jonathan Stewart:

some examples where it might seem like it.

Jonathan Stewart:

It doesn't hold all of the possibilities and it doesn't talk about the possible.

Jonathan Stewart:

Other alternatives.

Jonathan Stewart:

It's the kind of thing that they talk about in productivity or the time.

Jonathan Stewart:

You just store your tasks, write your tasks down, do your tasks, do your things.

Jonathan Stewart:

You store an X amount of things in your head.

Jonathan Stewart:

But.

Jonathan Stewart:

It's not quite enough now, do we know how the brain works?

Jonathan Stewart:

No, not fully, which is why I've not said it's completely not true

Jonathan Stewart:

but for me, this doesn't seem to fit that analogy is not quite enough.

Jonathan Stewart:

There is so much more nuance to this conversation.

Jonathan Stewart:

A little nerdy fact for you years and years before computers exist, there were

Jonathan Stewart:

multiple different things that our brain was compared to going back a fair ways.

Jonathan Stewart:

It was first documented in the Bible that the brain was dirt and clay

Jonathan Stewart:

and some form of being be it soul.

Jonathan Stewart:

was put in there.

Jonathan Stewart:

Then we moved to the third century where we figured out how to collect

Jonathan Stewart:

store and transport and use water.

Jonathan Stewart:

So our brains, and also how we functioned was compared to the movement of water,

Jonathan Stewart:

such as things like water pumps, which believe it or not last for 1,600 years.

Jonathan Stewart:

Holding us back quite considerably.

Jonathan Stewart:

We also had other comparisons with the creation of self operating machines

Jonathan Stewart:

in the 15th and 16 hundreds alongside lots of other wonderful and fascinating

Jonathan Stewart:

comparisons, including a Telegraph I'm.

Jonathan Stewart:

Going back to this now.

Jonathan Stewart:

A computer.

Jonathan Stewart:

To summarize a brain was compared to the latest modern advancement at the time.

Jonathan Stewart:

We really don't actually understand what our brain can do,

Jonathan Stewart:

but comparing it to a computer.

Jonathan Stewart:

Is oversimplified.

Jonathan Stewart:

The thing that excites me most about this is that it opens up opportunities

Jonathan Stewart:

to rethink what our brain actually is and how it can support us.

Jonathan Stewart:

When you see science in the business world.

Jonathan Stewart:

It's often based on research that it's at best is over-simplified or worse.

Jonathan Stewart:

Completely debunked.

Jonathan Stewart:

When I'm trying to figure new things out, I look.

Jonathan Stewart:

Into sports psychology.

Jonathan Stewart:

Because, although there are still some issues I do enjoy being on the cutting

Jonathan Stewart:

edge and realizing things are nowhere near, as simple as people in the business

Jonathan Stewart:

world commonly make it out to be.

Jonathan Stewart:

And that is delightfully freeing.

Jonathan Stewart:

We are bombarded by science advice that has been grossly simplified.

Jonathan Stewart:

Don't take everything you hear on face value.

Jonathan Stewart:

I believe that starting from you allows you to figure out how you work.

Jonathan Stewart:

As there is still a lot.

Jonathan Stewart:

We still don't know.

Jonathan Stewart:

And starting from you it's a good place to begin.

Jonathan Stewart:

Don't want to go it alone, reach out to me at simplicity.

Jonathan Stewart:

Dash specialist.com.

Got An Impossible Problem?